IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

Stormwater Management Makes Stockholm Royal Seaport a Resilient Model

Stockholm Royal Seaport (Norra Djurgårdsstaden) has developed a comprehensive, integrated stormwater system that purifies and slows storm water and meltwater before it is released into the sea. The system connects green roofs and rooftop gardens with ponds, open storm drain water, surface water drains and urban greenery.

Norra Djurgårdsstaden (Stockholm Royal Seaport) is Sweden’s largest urban development area, spanning 236 hectares and is planned to be an attractive, resource-efficient, fossil-free neighbourhood. Its vision is to be an international model for sustainable urbanisation. The new city district will have at least 12,000 homes and 35,000 workplaces.

Combining resilient and attractive environments

One of the most important sustainability issues for Stockholm Royal Seaport is to design the entire district so it can withstand possible future effects of climate change such as high seawater levels, more intensive rain and risk of flooding. It’s also intended to offer attractive outdoor environments during warm and dry periods.

Integrated stormwater system

The area’s stormwater system is integrated with green roofs and rooftop gardens, which interact with water flows in courtyards, streets, grass lawns, rain gardens, ponds and stormwater sewers. The greenery in courtyards and on walls and roofs enhance the surrounding park ecosystems, contributing to a robust ecosystem overall. Urban greenery, stormwater ponds and urban wetlands all work to delay and purify the storm water, which is eventually released into Husarviken bay or Värtan strait.

Directing 75 percent of storm water to plant beds

The objective of the system is to create a robust system to combat flooding, purify storm water and be a resource for irrigation and other ecosystem services. The elevation in the area is designed so the water flows above ground when the system is overloaded. The scheme primarily aims to direct storm water to plant beds for delay and purification. The target is for at least 75 percent of storm water in streets and squares to be directed to plant beds.

Public spaces are designed to provide filtration locally in the form of plant beds to ensure satisfactory stormwater management. The plant beds have a storage capacity that allows them to withstand a long period of drought without irrigation, and to resist high water flows from intensive rain.

The intricate water management system makes Stockholm Royal Seaport a showcase for developing urban and seaside areas that are both resilient and attractive.


Similar Best Practices

Brunnshög – a future to believe in

Brunnshög – a future to believe in

Everyone is talking about a smarter, more sustainable future. In Brunnshög, this future is being realized. And it is being created around the people who will live here, focusing on their future needs.

The Intelligent District Heating System

The Intelligent District Heating System

In Karlshamn a rewarding collaboration has been going on for many years between several actors who together have created a sustainable and intelligent district heating system. The system, which is controlled using the latest technology in AI, is constantly evolving to help create a future sustainable energy system.

It´s innovation through collaboration!

Build for the future – Villazero

Build for the future – Villazero

Villazero is a development project run by Fiskarhedenvillan, Mondo Arkitekter and Structor Byggteknik Dalarna together with support from Region Dalarna. The purpose of the project is to build a carbon-neutral detached house in Borlänge. A unique opportunity for us involved to learn how to build together for a more sustainable future.

Sweden’s first fossil-free preschool in Gothenburg

Sweden’s first fossil-free preschool in Gothenburg

When the preschool ‘Hoppet’ in Gothenburg was to be built, the City of Gothenburg wanted to challenge and create a change in the construction industry; they wanted it to be built completely fossil-free throughout the building’s entire life cycle with regards to production, assembly and future operation.

Tvärpilen – a small residential area, big on sustainability

Tvärpilen – a small residential area, big on sustainability

In the small village, Kivik, in the southeast of Sweden, you find the new residential area, Tvärpilen, where the Beautiful, the Sustainable and the Responsible come together in perfect combination.

Fossil-free steel demonstration plant in Vitåfors (Gällivare)  – direct reduction of iron ore pellets with hydrogen

Fossil-free steel demonstration plant in Vitåfors (Gällivare) – direct reduction of iron ore pellets with hydrogen

HYBRIT’s demonstration plant in Vitåfors will demonstrate the value chain for fossil-free steel on an industrial scale. It includes production of hydrogen and of sponge iron by direct reduction with hydrogen. The plant is planned to be ready in 2026.

Fossil-free steel pilot plant in Luleå – direct reduction of iron ore pellets with hydrogen

Fossil-free steel pilot plant in Luleå – direct reduction of iron ore pellets with hydrogen

HYBRIT is conducting trials on direct reduction of iron ore pellets, using hydrogen produced by fossil-free electricity. HYBRIT is also building a pilot hydrogen storage to test the best way to store hydrogen underground.

Haraholmen – a green industrial park where sustainability is key

Haraholmen – a green industrial park where sustainability is key

Haraholmen is an industrial park where sustainability is key. The site uses renewable energy, welcomes companies with green profiles, and is a hub for resource-efficient transportation with access to roads, railways, and a deep-water port.

Markbygden 1101 – Europe’s largest onshore wind farm

Markbygden 1101 – Europe’s largest onshore wind farm

Markbygden 1101 is the largest onshore wind power project in Europe. Once completed, it will consist of up to 1101 wind turbines that together will produce up to 12 TWh per year. This is comparable with around 8% of Sweden’s electricity production.

Site East –  a climate neutral construction site

Site East – a climate neutral construction site

At Skellefteå Site East, close to Northvolt’s factory, conditions are created to create the most sustainable development project ever. By maximizing the cutting edge know-how of both Skellefteå municipality and external partners, Skellefteå Site East is a source of inspiration for the industry. Both in terms of the courage to dare to think and act in new ways around sustainability, and in working together with contractors towards a common vision.

Wood Safari – experience how creative wood ideas turns in to sustainable living environments

Wood Safari – experience how creative wood ideas turns in to sustainable living environments

The advances made in wood construction are attracting more and more attention from contractors and architects that are discovering the advantages of building in wood. In Skellefteå you can take part in something as rare as a wood safari. A learning experience in how creative wood ideas create climate-smart living environments and how sustainable building ensures that the city develops in an attractive way, in both the near and more distant future.

Skellefteå Airport – a green airport

Skellefteå Airport – a green airport

At a time when the global aviation sector is facing increasing demands to get on a sustainable flightpath, one airport in northern Sweden has gotten a head start with an extensive vision that has led them to become one of Europe’s and probably the world’s first fossil-free airport. At the same time the airport is now preparing to become a testcenter for electric powered and vertical-starting aircrafts.

My Visit Plan Favorite star